Cincinatti Mobile Notary Service Implicated in Fraud

It’s Not Just Philly, Mobile Notary Service Owner Implicated in Stealing Homes in Cincinatti

A mobile notary service owner has been implicated in part of another set of homes being stolen right from under the owners.

Have to admit, this one hurts. Beyond what is in the news, we have verified the notary and the mobile notary service that they run.

This scam worked similarly to the one in Philly. That story has become a huge news story in the northeast, and you can check out our recent articles about Philly and the Philly Fiasco.

A Mobile Notary Service Owner?

Unfortunately, it appears so.

When asked what happened, [redacted] said they met [redacted] and [redacted] and agreed to sign the deed.

“I met these people in a parking lot, OK?” they said from their front porch.

For their part, they are saying that they were duped and are cooperating with the investigation.

But, if media reports and released questioning are to be believed, they knew full well what they were doing was illegal, and they did it anyway.

(Do not click the following links unless you want to see names.)

When asked what happened, [redacted] said (sic) they met [redacted] and [redacted] and agreed to sign the deed.
“I met these people in a parking lot, OK?” (sic) they said from (sic) their front porch.

Local 12

What Did They Say to Police About Their Actions

From what we can tell, their definition of being duped is definitely not ours. If the police transcripts are true (and we have no reason to believe they are not), they admitted to knowingly breaking the law.

A law that allowed at least five homes to be stolen from their owners.

Again, don’t click unless you want names.

Officer: You did violate the golden rule, which is you’re supposed to watch them sign it?
[Redacted]: Yep.
Officer: So, in other words, you said, ‘I’m not supposed to put a notary without them being here’?
[Redacted]: Right.

Local 12

It’s Not Just the One Notary

At least two other notaries are under investigation according to detectives working on the case.

Deeds they are alleged to signed have quite a bit more chutzpah, including an entire apartment building and a church.

So, Were the Notaries Duped?

Look, we always give benefit of the doubt to the notary. We don’t name names. Heck, in this article we didn’t even name the business, or the names of the non notaries alleged of the crime.

But, if media and police statements are correct, it becomes harder to sympathize.

How can you be duped when you admit knowingly committing fraud? When you meet your customers in a parking lot and all the signers are not there?

So, while we will continue to give the benefit of the doubt to the mobile notary and others, we have to say it is a bit harder to do in this circumstance than others we have covered.

That said, imagine if we named names on the notary originally accused in the aforementioned Philly scandal. The one who was completely exonerated a few weeks later.

That would have been wrong, and it would be wrong in this case as well, unless and until they plead out, are found guilty, or are exonerated.

(We still wouldn’t release names, unless a notary was slandered in public and then exonerated. In that case, if the notary approves, we may as a way to help the notary regain their good name.)

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